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Research Guides

AFR 299: Caribbean Cultural Expressions & the Diaspora: Home

Alejandra Estefania Miami Carnaval poster

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Queen of Carnaval" by Alejandra Estefania

Resource Spotlight: Radio Garden

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Welcome!

I hope this guide will provide some useful starting places for your research. I'm available and happy to consult with you about any part of the research process, from finding and evaluating sources to understanding how to cite them. You can email me or make a Zoom appointment on my calendar

Karen​ Storz, Research & Instruction Librarian

Get Started with SuperSearch

SuperSearch can be a great place to start your search for journal articles, books, films, newspaper & magazine articles, and almost everything else the library has, in one easy to use interface. You can use the filters on the results screen to refine your search and improve your results. For example, try Peer-Reviewed Article to find scholarly journal articles, or choose Content Type: Encyclopedia Articles & More to find background sources. 

 

Because SuperSearch contains so much content from so many different kinds of sources, the results can sometimes be overwhelming and hard to focus. At the same time, SuperSearch is also not comprehensive and can miss key sources. To search with more focus, precision, and depth, be sure to try the databases recommended on this guide, as well as the library catalog for books and films. 

Critically Evaluate Your Sources

Here are some criteria to keep in mind when choosing and using both print and online sources:

  • Accuracy - What is the purpose of the document and why was it produced? Does the author cite their sources and are the sources legitimate?
  • Authority - Who wrote the source? Is the author credible? What are the author's credentials (educational background, past writing, experience) in this area? Have you seen the author's name cited in other sources or bibliographies? Who published the source? Is the publisher scholarly (university press, scholarly associations)? Commercial? Government agency? Is the source self-published (“vanity”press)? For online information, check the domain of the document — what institution publishes this document?
  • Objectivity - Does the author have a bias, political or commercial or persuasive?
  • Currency - Is this information new or based on outdated sources? Can you tell how current it is? How up-to-date are the links (if any)?
  • Audience - Who is the information written for: a specific readership, level of expertise, or age/grade level? Is the audience focus appropriate for a research paper?

 

If I'm not on chat and you need immediate assistance, you can use the main library Ask Us chat

Karen Storz

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Karen Storz
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Contact:
781-283-3372
kstorz@wellesley.edu
Schedule an Appointment

Research & Instruction Librarian
Office: Clapp Library 218B