This is the "Home" page of the "Primary Sources - Literature" guide.
Alternate Page for Screenreader Users
Skip to Page Navigation
Skip to Page Content

Primary Sources - Literature   Tags: manuscript, primary sources  

primary sources, literature
Last Updated: Jul 11, 2014 URL: http://libguides.wellesley.edu/primarylit Print Guide RSS Updates

Home Print Page
  Search: 
 

.

Detail from early manuscript of The Sun Also Rises.

Image via avrenim_acceber at Flickr, used under Creative Commons license.

Finding Primary Sources

Primary sources in literature are original, uninterpreted information (often, but not exclusively textual) relevant to a literary research topic. Examples include original works of fiction, art, or music; letters; diaries; interviews; or even works of criticism.

The key question to ask when trying to classify a source as primary versus secondary is how you intend to use it. If a work was written or created during the time period that you are researching, it can be used as a primary source.

For example:

A 1922 review of T. S. Eliot's The Waste Land would be considered a secondary source if your project is an analysis of Eliot's poem, but would be a primary source if your topic is the critical reception of Eliot's works, or the perception of modernism as a literary style in the 1920s.

Visit Special Collections to use original texts in print or manuscript.

In addition to the digital resources listed in this guide under the tabs above, here are tips for finding printed/published  versions of primary sources.

      

    Subject Librarian

    Profile Image
    Laura O'Brien
    JavaScript disabled or chat unavailable.
    Contact Info
    If I'm off chat, please email me, so I can get back to you later.
    Or, make an appointment.
    Send Email
     
    Description

    Loading  Loading...

    Tip